YouTube Revolutionizes the Porn Industry
The Sex eZine - YouTube Porn Clones


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YouTube is Revolutionizing the Porn Industry... and Killing it at the same time.

This is the beginning and the end of the porn industry as we know it. From here on in porn, like television, will be free and advertising supported.

As if it wasn't already conveniently free to download, now you can watch YouTube-like video streaming, vote for your favourites and embed them in your websites.

Just like YouTube.

It is all ridiculously convenient, and it is all a matter of time as advertisers will realize the value of promoting Pepsi soda pop, Ford cars, Tommy Hilfiger jeans and a whole lot more by doing what they've always done: Use sex to sell a product.

Advertisers have been using sex for decades to sell everything, so it should come as no surprise that they will start selling products using hardcore porn.

Even within a softcore magazine like Playboy there was a long line of racy adverts. Usually from the likes of Camel cigarettes, beer and alcohol companies, cologne and car companies.

Of course, YouTube.com doesn't actually allow porn on their servers. Smart move. They need to keep parents on their side.

But that hasn't stopped legions of other people starting up their own video porn hosting services using the exact same technology. Like these below:

In Order of Popularity

YouPorn.com

RedTube.com

PornoTube.com

XTube.com

Yuvutu.com

Spankwire.com

Shufuni.com

PacoPorn.com

DirtyTube.com

PornVue.com

SocialPorn.com

Snizzshare.com

Pornovue.com

YouTubeBabes.net

Loss of Parental Control

If parents want to keep images of their graphic sex hidden away from their little darlings, they might have to throw away their computers. As we can see from the list above there has been a virtual orgasm of online video inspired by YouTube.

Borrowing the same upload model and willful disregard for copyright laws, the next generation of porn sites have made it a whole lot easier for little Johnny to watch videos with names like "teens in satin panties" and "Adriana Sage rides the monkey rocker".

The major sites are currently running in Beta test mode, and while they all feature adult warnings and RTA ("Restricted to Adults") labels, very few requires a member login. And even then, no credit card information is requested: Just a check box indicating whether users are over 18-years-old.

Porn Industry Losing Profits

Money talks, especially when it walks away.

The porn industry has always been an early adopter of new technology but in this case the technology is biting back.

For years, adult content has spurred the development of VHS, DVD movies, adult channels on cable TV, pay-per-view, video streaming, online payment systems, adult channels on mobile phones and more.

Yet even though adult video content has been available on peer-to-peer sharing systems for years, it took good olí traditional non X-rated video, whether user generated or copied from commercial content, to take YouTube from non-existence to a company scooped up by Google for US $1.6 billion.

But not everything is happy and horny in the land of bananas and huge melons.

The porn industry, which is used to viagra-sized profits, has suddenly seen a huge drop in DVD and online sales. The problem is that people prefer to get porn for free if they can (and avoid embarrassing credit card bills their spouse might see) and streaming video porn provides it with little or no hassle. Why pay for something at one website when you can get it for free at another?

Afterall, that is what masturbation is all about right? Instant gratification.

Technically people have been able to download free porn video via peer-to-peer networks for years, along with TV shows, movies and mp3s thanks to the Napster Revolution back in 2000. But even downloading that way you had to wait minutes or hours for the clip or movie to download. Now it is downloaded, streamed and buffered in mere seconds.

The next problem is that users can add their own content, which raises two important problems: Copyright and Pedophilia.

Obviously a system needs to be in place where pedophilia is deleted and the user who submitted it detained by police, but how do we determine ownership of digital porn clips? The "actors" aren't exactly famous most of the time and it would be rather difficult to prove what company they worked for (if any).

At the recently concluded Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas, one prominent XXX executive explained pornography's perfect marriage with the YouTube environment: "Customers do not want to watch entire movies," Hotmovies.com's Richard Cohen reportedly said. "They want to watch scenes."

If you think this is fringe business for a small gang of perverts, think again. According to web traffic monitor Alexa.com, many of the fledgling YouTube ripoffs rank among the top 200 websites in the world, well above Target.com, BestBuy.com, Earthlink.net, Netflix.com and social networking site Bebo.com. (Non-porn video-sharing sites Revver.com and Grouper.com, by comparison, are positioned somewhere between 2,500th and 3,000th.)

While these sites appeal to the most voyeuristic of (male) desires, web-watchers who think legit sites don't also appeal to lascivious minds are grossly mistaken. Google Video's top four clips recently were "Girls having fun on webcam," "Sex Accident," "Sexy webcam commercial," and "Cheerleader accident," while YouTube's top-viewed videos often feature some sort of young girl in a scantily clad outfit.

While LonelyGirl15 offers PG-rated confessions and new rising YouTube star Mia Rose (not to be confused with the pornstar of the same name) merely sings for the camera, these videos, with young attractive women performing and relating to the viewer in an intimate way, echo the look of online sex-chat rooms. While Bree and Mia may not be stripping or riding a monkey rocker, they are, to quote Britney Spears, "not that innocent," either.

Porn Industry Fights Back

Vivid is one the world's largest porn companies and they are now suing the Adult Entertainment Broadcast Network (AEBN).

Steven Hirsch, the co-founder of Vivid told reporters that: ďWe're dealing with rampant piracy, tons of free content".

Free content makes it very hard to make money from products people are no longer buying, causing traditional adult content providers to worry about their profitability and ability to produce future content. Vivid reports to have had $80 million in DVD sales profit in 2006. Sales in 2007 suddenly dropped to a mere $10 million, showing just how big video sharing's impact has been.

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Co-existence

Some companies have tried posting short clips of their content to adult oriented video sharing sites, but arenít sure how much is too much to give away.

It looks as though the traditional movie industry is going to have to push harder at delivering short and full length content down Internet connections to people that want it, and making their money not only from the sale of pay-per-view or pay-to-own movies, but also by offering that content free, paid for by advertising, be it product placement, contextual ads, actual short ad breaks or through other advertising means that generates revenue.

The adult industry is discovering that making money in the online world is becoming trickier and harder (pun intended).

But if any industry can break through and become profitable online in the face of online piracy and its global distribution, while giving users what they want, itís the porn industry.

Look out for plenty of oohs and aahs from the traditional media world who like to watch what the adult industry gets up to and how the adult industry figures it out!

Competition

Some adult industry executives say a solution may lie in future distribution deals with big US companies such as AT&T, Verizon Communications, Comcast and Apple.

An Apple spokeswoman said the company would not comment if it had held past talks or was interested in distributing adult product.

A spokeswoman for Comcast, the largest US cable provider, said the firm offered adult content in its video-on-demand service but said she knew of no talks for mobile adult distribution.

Sales of sex films to mobile devices occur in Europe but have yet to take off in the US.

"We won't make money through adult content," said Verizon Wireless spokesman Ken Muche.

AT&T did not comment.

Jay Grdina, president of ClubJenna Inc, a division of Playboy, said sharing previews was a mistake. "We're getting bitten by our own sword," he said.

Grdina, former husband and on-scene partner of Jenna Jameson, one of the industry's most famous porn stars, said he has met companies such as Microsoft and Apple to seek wireless and other distribution deals that could allow easy downloads to devices such as iPods.

A spokesman for Microsoft denies they are in talks to distribute adult content.

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